Assistant Professor, Simi Hoque, Helps Train Youth for a Green Energy-Efficient Economy

Low-Income Youth Are Training for Green Jobs with Help from UMass Amherst and Youth Build-Holyoke April 28, 2009 Contact: Janet Lathrop 413/545-0444 AMHERST, Mass. – A dozen young people now working toward their general educational development (GED) certificates in Holyoke are also gaining significant job skills for the green, energy-efficiency economy, thanks to community outreach efforts of the green building program at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, in collaboration with nonprofits YouthBuild-Holyoke and the Center for Ecological Technology (CET), Northampton. Simi Hoque, assistant professor in the new green building program at UMass Amherst, says seven men and five women between 16 and 20 years old who are already enrolled in Youth Build-Holyoke classes are the first group of what organizers hope will be many to benefit from this community-university partnership. The goal is to improve the young people’s skills and job prospects in energy and environmental conservation in western Massachusetts. Hoque and Darnell Goldson, executive director of YouthBuild-Holyoke, with CET, an energy management agency, designed the...
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Current and Former Aboriculture Students Place Top Honors

On Saturday 2 May, 38 tree climbers competed in the New England Regional Tree Climbing competition at Look Park, in Northampton. Of the 38 climbers, 13 were current or former students in the Arboriculture & Community Forestry program in the Department of Natural Resources Conservation. The  women's champion was Marcy Gladdys, a graduate from 2007, and Melissa Duffy (2004) took second place. In the men's competition, Kyle McCabe, expected to graduate in May 2009, won the aerial rescue event. In the footlock speed climb event, UMass took first (Andrew Putnam '07), second (Kyle McCabe '09), and third (Jonathan Royce '07) place. Dr. Brian Kane noted, "Dennis Ryan and I are very proud of our current and former students. It's a real testament to their dedication and our program that they've excelled as climbers. UMass is a great place to get an education in arboriculture."...
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Asian longhorned beetle – Beetle Beware!

  Beetle Beware! In August 2008 a Worcester, MA resident discovered the exotic, invasive insect Asian longhorned beetle (Anoplophora glabripennis) in her neighborhood. Since the discovery, the United States Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, Massachusetts state agencies, and the City of Worcester have embarked on an effort to eradicate the beetle from the city of Worcester and four surrounding communities. The Asian longhorned beetle is a wood-boring Cerambycid with a wide-ranging appetite. It is a serious pest and many of its preferred host trees include common trees of northeastern forests and urban and suburban landscapes: maples, birches, elms, willows, and horsechestnuts. The Asian longhorned beetle is a large, distinctive shiny black insect with irregular white spots, white and black banded antennae that are at least as long as the body, and blue and black leg segments. In summer, the beetles emerge from trees through round exit holes 3/8-inch to 1/2-inch diameter. These exit holes...
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Urban Forestry seniors Dan Cohen and Chris Pineau placed first in national tree climbing competition

Urban Forestry seniors Dan Cohen and Chris Pineau (both STK '07) placed first among 37 teams at the national Student Career Days Tree Climbing Competition hosted by the Professional Landcare Network (PLANET), surpassing the second place team by 14 points. Chris and Dan finished in second place last year, so their victory in 2009 was especially sweet. Brian Kane, Massachusetts Arborists Association Asst. Prof. of Commercial Arboriculture, commented, "Chris and Dan have repeatedly demonstrated their climbing skills, and I'm really glad their hard work and perseverance paid off."...
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Mac Cloyes, an Arboriculture & Community Forestry student has been awarded a prestigious Garden Club of America Fellowship

 The $4,000 fellowship was awarded in recognition of Mac's outstanding academic achievement and his work on an important research project with Dr. Brian Kane. "Mac's worked really hard on several projects with me, and he's looking forward to continuing to work on research projects this summer," said Dr. Kane. Mac is currently investigating the extraction strength of different size lag screws in sugar maple and paper birch trees. Arborists typically use lag screws to install support systems in trees with poor branch attachments. Mac will present his findings at the International Society of Arboriculture's annual conference on July 27, 2009 in Providence, RI, as well as at the Massachusetts Statewide Undergraduate Research Conference on campus on May 1, 2009....
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