Naturally evolving

State of the College community gathering celebrates new faces, initiatives This fall, the College of Natural Sciences (CNS) welcomed 69 new faculty and nine new staff members to its 15 departments and schools. Some are brand-new to the university, and some are assuming new roles.  The State of the College event on September 16 gives new and returning members of the college community an opportunity to celebrate recent achievements, to hear from the Dean about collective goals and initiatives for the current academic year and beyond, and to share food, drink, and social time with colleagues. All staff, faculty, postdocs, and graduate students are invited to attend.  New faculty and staff are also invited to have their portraits made by filling out this project request form. The 747 faculty members at CNS teach 7,450 undergraduate students and 983 graduate students, with over 600 staff members working to keep everything running smoothly for 33 bachelor’s degree programs, 39 different masters and PhD programs, and associate degrees in six areas.    We’re so pleased to have the diverse perspectives and skills of these new additions to our...
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BCT’s Fall 2019 Lecture Series Announced

BCT’s Fall 2019 Lecture Series Announced

The BCT program just announced its lecture series for the Fall semester 2019. All lectures are free and open to the public. AIA and USGBCI CES credits are available. You can find these events in our calendar or you can subscribe to the entire series in your calendar application using this link (ICS). Reposted from: https://bct.eco.umass.edu/news/bcts-fall-2019-lecture-series-announced/...
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BCT Welcomes Students (Back) to UMass for Fall 2019!

BCT Welcomes Students (Back) to UMass for Fall 2019!

Welcome back to UMass to all our undergrad and grad students! And welcome to all incoming students of the class of 2023! News As we start the new semester, there is some exciting news to share: We are welcoming Fernando Romero to our faculty! Fernando has been the lead project manager on many large construction projects in various countries. Being originally from Brazil, he joins our team after spending several years teaching construction in Illinois at SIUE. He will be teaching the core of our construction management curriculum, including BCT 353, 550, and 494 and will supervise ASC competitions and other student projects. You can learn more about him here. Congratulations to Peggi Clouston and Alex Schreyer on their well-deserved promotions! Dr. Clouston now holds the rank of full Professor and Mr. Schreyer is now Senior Lecturer II. Over summer, BCT students again completed many different internships in the region and we documented several of them on our Instagram feed. Below are some of those...
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Pulling all-nighters— black bears’ response to human development

Study shows human proximity affecting the sleeping patterns of black bears Kathy Zeller, Environmental Conservation, writes in  The Conversation about her recent study of the behavior of Massachusetts black bears as they move into human-dominated areas.     From “Black bears adapt to life near humans by burning the midnight oil”:  Why would black bears use populated areas? They are omnivorous opportunists with a good sense of smell, and can sniff out calorie-rich foods that often are found in developed areas, such as bird seed, pet food, garbage and even agricultural crops. These foods may be especially attractive to bears before and after hibernation, when the animals are living solely off stored body fat.   "Wild animals are increasing their nocturnal activity in response to development and other human activities." — Kathy Zeller Before hibernation in the fall, bears enter a metabolic state called hyperphagia – literally, excessive eating – in which they consume 15,000 to 20,000 calories a day. That’s roughly equivalent to eight large cheese pizzas or five gallons of chocolate ice cream. "Most...
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Students’ summer wardrobe: lab coat

Lee SIP scholars find training — and community — in labs across campus  Even as they investigate disparate scientific questions in labs all over campus, an expanding group of CNS undergraduates are making the same discovery about themselves: They are scientists.  Jiun Tseng, a rising junior and biology major, points out the lighter and darker shades of blue on a strip of gel that she’s stained in Larry Schwartz’s lab. “The whole gel is covered with protein,” she explains, “except where the specific enzymes we’re studying have chewed it all up and you get this clear spot. That’s a band that shows not just that your protein is there, but your protein is active.” She’s working with Schwartz to study programmed cell death in Manduca sexta caterpillars as part of the metamorphic process.   “Jiun has been in my lab just a couple of weeks,” explains Schwartz. “She watched me run these particular kinds of gels that we're doing and took careful notes. And then yesterday she just did the whole thing, soup to nuts. This isn’t busywork. You want the...
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