A community collaboration to create sustainable lobster fishing

UMass food science and environmental conservation researchers team up with Massachusetts fishing communities to develop sustainable alternative bait for lobster trapping  A collaboration of seafood processing firms, lobstermen and others in the Gloucester area, with fish ecologists and food science researchers on campus, have launched a new socio-economic study to look at developing and evaluating a sustainable alternative bait for use in the Gulf of Maine lobster fishery, says study director Adrian Jordaan, environmental conservation.    Jordaan, who is director of the Gloucester Marine Station (GMS), will lead the collaboration between the departments of food science and environmental conservation in research that grew out of cooperation between stakeholders in the Gloucester area and the campus’s marine station there. The work is supported by a two-year, $450,000 grant as part of the 2020 Sea Grant American Lobster Initiative.  Among the goals, Jordaan says, are to reduce the waste stream created by seafood processing. He will work with food scientist Amanda Kinchla and fish ecologists Brian Cheng and...
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‘A mosaic’ of unequal protection in wildlife conservation

Ecologists find that wildlife management and conservation models in South Africa do not provide equal protection to all carnivores  In results released this week, an international team of wildlife ecologists reports that the trend toward more reliance on private game farms and reserves to manage and conserve free-ranging carnivores in South Africa is more complicated than it appears – “a mosaic” of unequal protection across different land management types.    Chris Sutherland at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with first author and doctoral student Gonçalo Curveira-Santos of the Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Changes at the University of Lisbon, used a large network of camera traps to study occupancy of free-ranging carnivore species including leopards, hyenas, jackals and mongooses in different habitats and levels of protection in northeast South Africa.  Curveira-Santos says, “Widespread conversion of agricultural and livestock areas for commercial wildlife industry, ecotourism and hunting is a major component of conservation in South Africa. Management initiatives and conservation outcomes are typically focused on...
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Playing a ‘pivotal research and development role’ in cranberry agriculture

UMass Cranberry Station receives a $5.7 million in funding to improve the facility’s maintenance and research capabilities  The University of Massachusetts Amherst Cranberry Station in East Wareham, Mass., will receive $5.75 million in state support to fund laboratory improvements to its lab facilities.    The funding, which includes $5 million in capital spending authorized in the 2018 Environmental Bond Bill and a $750,000 grant from the Division of Capital Asset Management and Maintenance (DCAMM), will be used by the Cranberry Station to modernize and expand its research facilities, improve the environmental profile of the facility, and provide the research tools needed to support vigorous research programs in cranberry water, pest, and nutrient management. In addition, UMass Amherst has also committed $2 million for necessary deferred maintenance projects on the Cranberry Station, bringing the total cost of the project to approximately $7.75 million.  “Cranberries are one of Massachusetts’ signature agricultural products, and this funding will support vital research that ensures the cranberry industry will remain...
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BCT’s Fall 2020 Lecture Series Announced

BCT’s Fall 2020 Lecture Series Announced

The BCT program has announced its lecture series for the Fall 2020 semester. All lectures are free and open to the public (via Zoom). AIA and USGBCI CES credits are available. You can find these events in our calendar or you can subscribe to the entire series in your calendar application using this link (ICS). Reposted from: https://bct.eco.umass.edu/news/bcts-fall-2020-lecture-series-announced/...
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Honoring a student’s ‘tremendous potential to become a scientific leader in her field’

Doctoral student and advisor are selected for the highly competitive 2020 HHMI Gilliam Fellowship, a program that funds graduate research and diversity in science  Nadia Fernandez of Elkhart, Indiana, a Ph.D. student in Environmental Conservation, with her advisor molecular ecologist Lisa Komoroske, are one of 45 advisor-student teams to receive a coveted 2020 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Gilliam Fellowship for Advanced Study.    This award identifies emerging scientific leaders in biomedical and life sciences and supports the student’s research and professional goals, aims to improve faculty mentoring skills and promote diversity and inclusion in the sciences. It supports up to three years of the doctoral student’s dissertation research and provides the advisor an allowance to support diversity and inclusion efforts at the graduate and professional levels.  Fernandez says of the honor, “I’m incredibly humbled and honored to be awarded the HHMI Gilliam Fellowship for Advanced Study. I’m excited to network with other incredible scientists who are committed to increasing diversity, equity, inclusion and social justice in...
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