William DeLuca and Colleagues Uncover Blackpoll Warbler Migration Pattern

William DeLuca and Colleagues Uncover Blackpoll Warbler Migration Pattern

Courtesy: UMass News & Media Relations  Across North America and the Atlantic, Documenting an Enormous Migration Journey for a Tiny Songbird UMass Amherst, Canadian researchers identify blackpoll warbler migration routes March 19, 2019 Contact: Bill DeLuca 443/223-0991 Blackpoll warbler with backpack. Photo courtesy of Hilary Cook, Wildlife Conservation Society Canada.Blackpoll migration AMHERST, Mass. ­– Blackpoll warblers that breed in western North America may migrate up to 12,400 miles roundtrip each year, some crossing the entire North American continent before making a nonstop trans-ocean flight of up to four days to South America. Now a new study led by first author Bill DeLuca at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and project lead Ryan Norris at the University of Guelph, Ontario offers details of the feat. Reporting in the journal Ecology, DeLuca, Norris and colleagues provide new data on the central- and western-nesting blackpolls based on data collected from miniaturized geo-locators harnessed to the birds like tiny backpacks. Research teams deployed the dime-sized devices, weighing 0.5g and with a 12-month battery life, on male...
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Former Graduate Student, Amy Teffer, Awarded David H. Smith Conservation Research Fellowship

https://conbio.org/publications/scb-news-blog/2019-smith-fellows Amy Teffer will complete a project titled,“The Infectious Disease Ecology of Improved Watershed Connectivity: Reducing Uncertainty in Population Forecasts” under the academic mentorship of Dr. Lisa Komoroske at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst and in partnership with Dr. Benjamin Letcher at US Geological Survey....
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Graduate Student, Helena Murray’s Research Spotlighted – “Private forests, public benefits”

Graduate Student, Helena Murray’s Research Spotlighted – “Private forests, public benefits”

https://www.fs.fed.us/blogs/private-forests-public-benefits Private forests, public benefits Margee Haines Natural Resource Specialist, USDA Forest Service December 21, 2018 at 1:00pm Privately-owned forests provide water, recreational opportunities, timber and other forest products, as well as habitat for fish and wildlife. However, as forests become fragmented by roads or converted to development, the benefits they provide can be compromised or lost altogether. Now a new report is asking that we take a closer look at the economic contributions of the privately-owned forests – specifically, forests conserved through the USDA Forest Service’s Forest Legacy Program (FLP). The FLP is one way that the Forest Service responds to land use changes that threaten rural communities and economies. Researchers from the University of Massachusetts and the Forest Service used national, regional, and statewide data to estimate annual timber harvest volumes and wood utilization, the value of maple syrup production, and annual use and trip spending for fishing, hunting and snowmobiling for FLP-conserved properties in four areas of the country: the Northeast, Northern Wisconsin and Michigan, Idaho and Western Montana, and...
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