4th Annual UMass Student Tree Climbing Competition

On Saturday April 24th, students in the Arboriculture & Community Forestry program held the 4th Annual UMass Student Tree Climbing Competition in Kendrick Park in Amherst. This year, the competition coincided with Arbor Day festivities in Amherst, and many residents stopped by to see the students compete. The competition consists of four events:  two speed climbs, a rope throw for accuracy, and a work climb in which competitors move around the tree to ring bells hung on branches with their handsaw, simulating a typical pruning situation. Eliot Beals and Vicki Pavao, both juniors in the program, won the men's and women's competition, respectively. Thirteen students competed, and several alumni returned to help judge and time the events. Alumni also donated $1,200 worth of prizes. "This was a great competition, a beautiful day, and great fun for everyone involved," said Brian Kane, faculty advisor for the competition.   Video of past competitions can be found at http://youtube.com/cladrastis. ...
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Students Lead Walk on Local Land Trust Property

UMass forestry students Keith DiNardo and Bianca Kubierschky lead a walk on a newly acquired tract known as the Dan Glazier Forest,  owned by the Rattlesnake Gutter Trust in Leverett, Massachusetts.  Twelve people participated on a Sunday afternoon and enjoyed several hours exploring the property. The students are working on an independent practicum conducting an inventory of the forest, creating maps, and proposing the location of a trail as part of a semester project. Above: Keith Dinardo and Bianca Kubierschky (5th and 6th from left) and the group enjoy the afternoon on the Dan Glazier Forest. At Left: Keith Dinardo shows visitors a unique rock formation deep in the Dan Glazier Forest owned by the Rattlesnake Gutter Trust....
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NRC’s Family Forest Research Center Team Expands

The Family Forest Research Center, a collaborative effort between the USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station and the University of Massachusetts Amherst, Department of Natural Resources Conservation has recently expanded, adding three Forest Service Researchers to its collaborative national team. The goal of the FFRC is to conduct relevant research that helps understand the social and economic dimensions of family forestry in order to promote sustainable forest management that meets the current and future needs of landowners, communities, and society. In addition to the core group based here in Amherst, the center includes Dr. Zhao Ma, former FFRC Post-doc, now based at Utah State University , as well as: Dr. Marla Emery – Research Geographer, USDA-Forest Service Northern Research Station, Burlington, VT Currently focusing on contemporary nontimber forest product (NTFP) uses Dr. Evan Mercer – Research Economist, USDA-Forest Service Southern Research Station, Research Triangle Park, NC Engaged in a study projecting forest ownership changes in the southern United States Dr. Stephanie Snyder – Operations Research Analyst,...
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Research Based Extension Publication has Regional Impact

  Our forests provide many public benefits. 73% of the forests in the Northeast are ‘family forests’, owned by individuals and families. Reaching these tens of thousands of family forest owners with research based information to help inform their decisions about the management and protection of their land is critical to maintaining the benefits that flow from these lands at the present time and into the future.   Paul Catanzaro, an extension forester in the Department of Natural Resources Conservation, working in collaboration with Anthony D’Amato, PhD student at the time and current Assistant Professor of Silviculture at the University of Minnesota, developed a research based outreach publication titled, “High Grade Harvesting: Understand the Impacts, Know Your Options.”   High grade harvesting, or “high grading”, is a practice in which mainly the valuable high quality trees are removed, leaving behind a wood-lot of predominantly low-quality, low-value, slow growing trees, and resulting in negative financial impacts that can last decades.   Concerned about the impacts of high grading, the NY Chapter...
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Changes to ECo study options in Fall 2010

Starting in the Fall of 2010, undergraduate students in the Department of Environmental Conservation (ECo)  will choose from among three programs leading to a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degree: Building and Construction Technology Environmental Science Natural Resources Conservation What's changed? Building Materials and Wood Technology (BMATWT) has changed its name to Building and Construction Technology (BCT) (Read More...) The Natural Resources Conservation major: Rather than continuing to offer separate majors in Forestry/Urban Forestry/Arboriculture, Natural Resource Studies, and Wildlife and Fisheries Conservation, the new Natural Resources Conservation major will incorporate these into a single integrated major and students will specialize in one of six academic concentrations: Environmental Conservation; Fisheries Ecology & Conservation; Forest Ecology & Conservation; Urban Forestry & Arboriculture; Water Resources; and Wildlife Ecology & Conservation. How does the transition affect current and incoming students? Current Enrolled Students graduating after Fall 2010, will have the option to have their degree title remain as Forestry/Urban Forestry/Arboriculture, Natural Resource Studies, or Wildlife and Fisheries Conservation, or to file a “Change...
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