Arboriculture Team Competes at TCI Expo

On 4 November 2011, The UMass Arboriculture Team competed in the16th annual Student Career Days skills competition at TCI Expo in Hartford, CT. Team members Ethan Dangelo, Dave Golon, Alex Julius, Jason Sigman, and Bryan Westlake are all students in the Arboriculture & Community Forestry program.  Dave  took first place in the knowledge exam in the men's division; and Alex, a graduate student, won the overall competition in the women's division, placing first in the throwline, belayed speed climb, and knowledge events. Alex is studying tree worker safety with Dr. Brian Kane, the Massachusetts Arborists Association Professor of Commercial Arboriculture. Her M.S. thesis research has investigated compliance of commercial tree care companies with the industry's safety standard. This was the 16th annual student competition at TCI Expo, a national trade show and educational meeting for arborists and urban foresters. More information about Student Career Days can be found at:  http://www.tciaf.org/StudentCareerDays.aspx....
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Alum Appointed to MA DFW Post

Alumna Kim Bodary, ’99, Natural Resource Studies/Wildlife Biology, has been appointed Deputy Director for Administration in the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife, and will be stationed in the Division’s Boston office. Kim is returning to Massachusetts following 8 years of service in the administration of the Arizona Game and Fish Department....
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Natural Resource Conservation students provide inventory assistance to The Trustees of Reservations

The Trustees of Reservations (TTOR:   http://www.thetrustees.org/)   turned to the UMass Amherst Department of Environmental Conservation this semester seeking assistance in conducting a natural resource inventory  on a newly acquired property in nearby North Hadley,  just west of campus and within sight of Holdsworth Hall. The Trustees own over 100 properties throughout Massachusetts, amounting to almost 25,000 acres. Their new Mt. Warner property is 170 acres of woodland playing a unique ecological role in what is otherwise a landscape  heavily dominated by agriculture and development.   Lisa Gagnon, Keith Dinardo, Rene Veiera, Jim Boehmer, and Eric Kells applied their diversity of skills to assemble inventory information on wildlife, habitat,  hydrology, cultural history, vegetation, invasive plants and insects, and recreational usage to assist the Trustees with the development of a management plan for the property. See the class web site (NRC 597I: Natural Resource Inventory of Local Lands) to view a copy of the report. ...
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ECo Helps Community Leaders Increase Forest Conservation

How does the does the ECo Department impact the communities of Massachusetts?  One way is through the Keystone Project, an effort of Professor and State Extension Forester Dave Kittredge and Forest Resources Specialist Paul Catanzaro and assisted this year by graduate student Kate Losey. The Keystone Project, formerly Coverts, trains 20-25 landowners and community leaders across the state in subjects such as forest ecology and management, wildlife management and land conservation.  In return for the training, participants, called Keystone Cooperators, are asked to return to their communities and volunteer time towards a forest conservation project of their choosing, with continued support from Kittredge and Catanzaro.  This year’s 23rd annual Keystone Project training took place April 14th – 17th at the Harvard Forest. Does it work?  In a recent survey of Keystone Cooperator activity, Cooperators collectively report volunteering 42,650 hours of time over the last 12 months or the equivalent of 20 full-time people out in communities promoting conservation!  The most often reported...
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Family Forest Research Center launches National Woodland Owner Survey

With the help of half a dozen dedicated undergraduate student workers, the Family Forest Research Center, a joint effort between the University of Massachusetts and the USDA Forest Service, has launched the 2011 version of the National Woodland Owner Survey.  In the upcoming weeks roughly 18,000 private landowners across the country will open their mailboxes to find a copy of the questionnaire, asking about who they are, why they own land, what they’ve done with it in the past, and what they plan to do with it in the future. An estimated 11 million private owners collectively control over half of the forested land in the United States.  Of these 11 million owners, 92% are families, individuals, trusts, estates, and other unincorporated groups. The recurring survey, last conducted in 2006, provides information on changes in attitude and behavior and allows a better understanding of this diverse and dynamic group that will help to foster better forest policies, more effective services and programs,...
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