Susannah Lerman’s Neighborhood Nestwatch Research Featured by NEPR

Courtesy of New England Public Radio:  http://nepr.net/news/2014/08/22/study-keeps-a-close-eye-on-backyard-birds-in-western-mass/Study Keeps A Close Eye On Backyard Birds In Western Mass. by: Nancy Cohen AUGUST 22, 2014 GREENFIELD, Mass. Most studies about birds focus on wild habitat. But this summer researchers from the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center in Washington, D.C., are focusing on backyards.The study, called Neighborhood Nestwatch, is taking place in five areas along the east coast from Florida to western Massachusetts. It’s early in the morning in a small backyard in Greenfield. “I can just, just get some of the red of his crown catching the sunlight a little bit,” says urban wildlife ecologist Susannah Lerman of UMass Amherst. She’s peering up through binoculars at a distinctive bird that’s foraging for insects in a tall tree. “A pileated woodpecker in Greenfield, in downtown Greenfield! it’s pretty exciting,” she says. The bird is usually found in forests. Lerman, who heads up the Neighborhood Nestwatch study in the state, says she’s always impressed with what she finds. “You know, you go in with such low...
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Dr. Brian Kane Awarded Alex L. Shigo Award for Excellence in Arboriculture Education

Dr. Brian Kane Awarded Alex L. Shigo Award for Excellence in Arboriculture Education

  Dr. Brian Kane, the Massachusetts Arborists Association Professor of Arboriculture, has been awarded the Alex L. Shigo Award for Excellence in Arboricultural Education from the International Society of Arboriculture. This award recognizes the important role that education plays in enhancing the quality and professionalism of the arboriculture industry through sustained excellence in arboricultural education.The ISA has over 22,000 members worldwide and selected two recipients for this year's award, an impressive accomplishment for Brian. ...
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Large Pelagic Research Center Study of Bigeye Tuna in Northwest Atlantic Uses New Tracking Methods

Courtesy of UMass News and Media Relations July 31, 2014 Contact: Janet Lathrop 413/545-044 AMHERST, Mass. – A first-of-its-kind study of bigeye tuna movements in the northwestern Atlantic Ocean led by Molly Lutcavage, director of the Large Pelagics Research Center at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, found among other things that these fish cover a wide geographical range with pronounced north-south movements from Georges Bank to the Brazilian shelf, and they favor a high-use area off Cape Hatteras southwest of Bermuda for foraging. This NOAA-funded research, which used a new approach to study one of the most important commercial tuna species in the Atlantic, provides the longest available fishery-independent record of bigeye tuna movements to date. Data should help researchers to further characterize habitat use and assess the need for more monitoring in high-catch areas. Results appear this week in an early online edition of the Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Science. Fisheries oceanographer Lutcavage says, “Although Atlantic bigeye tuna are delivering high prices to the U.S. commercial...
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Kristina Stinson has been nominated to participate in exclusive trip to National Institute of Environmental Health Services

Kristina Stinson has been nominated by the Dean and Associate Dean to participate in an exclusive trip to the NIH – National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences. This exclusive trip is sponsored by the Vice Chancellor for Research and Engagement and produced by the Office of Research Development. The September 11th-12th trip to NIEHS in Research Triangle Park, N.C., is geared to connect a select group of other early-career faculty members, with NIEHS personnel. The program will provide participants with useful insights about NIEHS from Health Scientist Administrators (i.e., program officers) and senior officials, including Dr. Gwen Collman, Director of the Division of Extramural Research & Training. Personal meetings with POs provide an opportunity to: 1) learn about NIEHS program priorities that may not be explicit in RFPs, 2) explain research goals in person, and 3) begin to establish a long-term relationship with key individuals at NIEHS....
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