Meet the 2014 Cree Culture Participants

Dr. Paul Barten instructs this small, interdisciplinary course which combines reading and group discussions, a winter camping trip with a Cree family in northern Quebec (during Spring Recess), and an individual term project and essay to explore (1) traditional and contemporary Cree culture, (2) the local, regional, and international use of natural resources (wood fiber, minerals, hydropower), and (3) fundamental issues of sustainability, stewardship of the environment, and social justice. The term project will be designed collaboratively with the instructor to build upon, integrate, and extend each student’s interests, talents, and skills in relation to the course content. Meet the 2014 Cree Culture Participants...
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Summer 2014 Undergraduate Research Opportunities

Students are encouraged to seek out research experience while pursuing their undergraduate degree. Students desiring a research experience should review the list of faculty research projects provided below and see what opportunities are available. Students must contact faculty directly to express their interest and get more information. Students may earn academic credit for their research experience. Some of these research opportunities are paid positions. Read each posting carefully to see what compensation is available. Basic Instructions: 1) Student should review list of available projects below, and then contact faculty members directly to learn more about project expectations and qualifications (if any) that are needed. Students must provide the following information with their inquiry: *Student name, class year, GPA, list of any relevant course work completed, number of hours available to work on project each week; specific skills/experience/training/availability required for the project based on the advertisement listed here. Indicate “SUMMER RESEARCH INTERN” in the subject line of your email. 2) To earn academic credit, an...
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Graduate Student, Javier Sabogal receives Eugene M. Isenberg Scholarship

Courtesy of UMass News and Media Office Ten graduate students have received Eugene M. Isenberg Awards for the spring semester. Eugene M. Isenberg, a 1950 alumnus and retired CEO of Nabors Industries, Inc, and his wife Ronnie, established the gift. The scholarships are awarded to graduate students who demonstrate academic merit and a commitment to the integration of science or engineering with management. The scholarships of up to $10,000 apiece annually are intended to prepare recipients for leadership roles in high-tech ventures, corporate research and development, technically oriented businesses and other entrepreneurial initiatives. With these 10 new scholars, a total of 135 Eugene M. Isenberg Awards have been granted since 1995. The recipients are doctoral students Timothy S. Gehan, chemistry, Ryan Guggenmos, accounting, Daniel R. King, polymer science and engineering, Michael Prokle, industrial engineering and operations management, Sandra M. Robinson, animal biotechnology and biomedical sciences, Sara Saberi, operations and information management, Javier Sabogal, environmental conservation, Akshaya Shanmugam, electrical and computer engineering, Bicheng Wu,...
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Identification of Northeastern Nomada Workshop Announced

Identification of Northeastern Nomada Workshop Nomada imbricate, female. Photo by Sam Droege       Course Dates:  March 16-18, 2014 Course Location:  University of Massachusetts – Amherst Course Leaders:  Sam Droege (USGS, Patuxent Wildlife Research Center), Sophie Cardinal, Ph.D (Canadian National Collection of Insects) Course limit:  18 participants Registration:  contact jmilam@eco.umass.edu to register   Course Description: The purpose of this advanced workshop is to teach participants to identify Nomada using online and published keys. The course will take place over three days and will consist of discussions on approaches to identification problems and microscope work. In particular, Sam Droege and Sophie Cardinal will share their experience separating tricky species pairs to supplement and clarify information available in print and online resources. By the conclusion of the workshop students should have an improved understanding and confidence to more efficiently recognize Nomada species and to reliably separate tricky bee species pairs, allowing them to identify a greater proportion of their own material and to better prepare remaining specimens for further study by regional and...
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Paige Warren’s NSF Research Coordination Network grant collaboration, “A global analysis of the impacts of urbanization on bird and plant diversity reveals key anthropogenic drivers”

Cities are often thought of as concrete jungles, not capable of supporting biodiversity. In this study, we examined the birds in 54 cities and plants in 110 cities worldwide. We found that cities support surprisingly high numbers of plant and bird species. However, cities have also lost significant biodiversity with urbanization. The most common species worldwide are pigeons and annual meadow grass. As urbanization continues to expand, conservation of blocks of intact vegetation within cities could enhance biodiversity. Despite declines in species, cities still retain endemic native species, providing opportunities for regional and global biodiversity conservation, restoration, and education. Click here for more information...
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