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UMass alumnus Wayne MacCallum (’68, Wildlife Biology) Retired as Director of the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife

Posted: July 28th, 2015
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Photo by: Mary Romaniec-Grafton News

UMass alumnus Wayne MacCallum (’68, Wildlife Biology) retired as Director of the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife at the end of end of February 2015. He has been Director for 27 years. MacCallum received his Bachelor’s degree in Wildlife Biology from the University of Massachusetts in 1968 and his Master’s Degree from Penn State University where he studied the nesting ecology of Black Ducks. MacCallum joined the then Massachusetts Division of Fish & Game as a waterfowl technician. Shortly thereafter, he entered the private sector and over a ten year period progressed from Staff Scientist, to Manager of environmental management services for Woodward Clyde Consultants. 

 

MacCallum returned to the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries and Wildlife (DFW) in 1983 as the Assistant Director of Wildlife and became Director in 1988. MacCallum has served as president of the Northeast Fish and Wildlife Directors Association and the International Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.  Wayne MacCallum served as chairman of the Atlantic Flyway Council, the Atlantic Coast Joint Venture, and the Woodcock Task Force.  He also served as a member of the North American Wetlands Conservation Council, the Sea Duck Joint Venture, and the International Task Force on Waterfowl Regulations.  He has been honored by numerous conservation and sporting groups in Massachusetts and by professional and national conservation organizations such as Ducks Unlimited, National Wild Turkey Federation, The Wildlife Society and the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies.

 

The Massachusetts Fisheries and Wildlife Board dedicated the large Wildlife Management Area adjacent to the Division’s Westborough Mass  Field Headquarters in MacCallum’s name. He had led the effort to acquire this as an important wildlife habitat area.